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#13 Kitchen Hints -

In the last post (about reducing the risks of Macular Degeneration), we talked about eating. Now I’d like to share some hints about how Millie cooks. If you have additional hints, please share them with me on the contact page and I will pass them along.

Microwave.
It’s possible to buy a talking microwave that tells you what button you pushed.  Millie didn’t have such a machine, but she learned how to use adhesive tape to identify functions on her machine. She had a small piece of tape on the start button, the end button, and the 30 second button. That’s it. If she wanted to warm up leftovers from the restaurant, she pushed the 30 second button again and again depending on how much food was on her plate. When the machine stoped, she touched the food to check the temperature.

Stove.
Millie also used pieces of tape on her stove. For each burner, she applied 2 pieces of tape, one on the off section of the dial and one on the medium section. If she wanted low heat, she turns the dial to between off and medium. If she wanted high heat, she turned the dial to between medium and off.

Oven. 

The oven dial also had 2 pieces of tape, one for “off,” the other for 350 degrees. No, she didn’t bake everything at 350 :-).  She baked above and below that number by judging the distance.

Mugs.

Millie loved coffee and discovered that light colored mugs work the best to fill her cup with black coffee. She used her peripheral vision to see how full her cup was.

Cutting boards.
Two, one white and one dark, allows for cutting either light or dark colored food on the opposite color.

George Foreman grill.

Millie discovered how easy this grill is easy to operate. Plug it in. Wait 5 minutes for it to preheat. Put your chop, steak, or fish on it and set your timer. You guessed it – she had a piece of tape on her timer for 5 minutes and judged her time from that one piece. Don’t forget to unplug the grill when finished.

Cans. 

If Millie wanted to know what can she was opening, she used her Visual Magnifying Machine to check the label. Once a can is identified, a piece of paper with the word “PEACHES” or whatever can be attached to the can with a rubber band or scotch tape. You might consider a system like one rubber band for fruit, 2 rubber bands for vegetables, and 3 rubber bands for soup.